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timberland
10-02-2010, 09:59 PM
I have been a coin laundry owner for 12 years and do all of my own maintenance. thought I would share my R&R from years ago.....

This is the front of a W74, However the W124 and W184 are constructed the same…only larger and heavier.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/MVC-001F.jpg

Back of W74
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/MVC-002F.jpg

Back with rear cover removed
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/MVC-003F.jpg

Lets get to it!!! lock the front door and tilt the machine on it’s face. Place 2- 2x4 blocks of wood so the front panel rest on the wood…if you don’t you may at this time want to order a new selector switch, maybe a door, a timer from the bent shaft and the clear plastic cover for the timer…get a couple pieces of 2x4 it’s your friend here and considerably cheaper.

Remove the snap ring from the belt pulley or nut if it has one. Place a H beam puller with bolts and nuts to pull the pulley off. Do not heat this piece as it’s aluminum. PAY attention here…the small rubber seal on the backside of the pulley is sometimes not included in a rebuild kit, so keep this seal. If you cannot find a H puller, buy a steering wheel puller at Sears, it will work too.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/MVC-004F.jpg

timberland
10-02-2010, 10:10 PM
Remove the 4 bolts that hold the rear trunion housing on. NOTICE the trunion housing has a marking “UP” , remember this. Place a Sears 8” puller on the housing ears, tighten the puller and hit the centerbolt of the puller with a 2# hammer, the housing will pop off.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/MVC-005F.jpg

If the bearing didn’t stay in the housing, place the puller back around the bearing and remove from the shaft.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/MVC-006F.jpg

REMOVE THE SNAP RING FROM THE GREASE,….. REPEAT…REMOVE THE SNAP RING… then remove the spacer.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/MVC-007F.jpg

Remove the hoses and water connection panel from the rear gable. Remove the gable band clamp.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-008f.jpg

timberland
10-02-2010, 10:10 PM
Place a large flat screw driver between the rear gable and outer drum and GENTLY pry all around..SMALL STEPS ON THE PRYING THERE HERCULISE, You DON’T WANT TO BEND THE DRUM FLANGE.

Remove the inner drum and gable as one piece and place it on the floor, the W74 is easy to do your self, W124 you may want help, W184 Get help, you’ll need it…unless your into hernia operations. You did remove that snap ring from the step above correct? …if not, do it now it your last chance.

Install the rear trunion without the bearings back on the gable and snug the 4 bolts. Install the 8” puller and pull the rear gable, bearing and housing off as one piece from the inner drum. IF IT DOES NOT REMOVE EASILY, STOP, STOP!….. YOU DID REMOVE THE SNAP RING CORRECT???
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-009f.jpg

Remove the rear trunion and bearing. Look closer….notice the direction of the seal lips in the gable. Two seals face (cups) towards the inner drum, one seal faces towards the trunion. There will be a test,……… remember this.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0011f.jpg

Notice the grooves in the sleeve? This is from the rubber seals running on the sleeve, it did it’s job until the wearable part…the sleeve, was worn past the seal lips…and then started leaking water into the bearings. This machine was obviously run for a while before I got it and did the rebuild.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0010f.jpg

This is the time consuming part…take your time here. Safety glasses are required, you get two eyes, let’s keep them. Take a 4 ½” rotary disc steel grinder and grind a flat onto the wear ring until you are about 1/16” from the shaft. Now 180 degrees from that flat do it again. Take a flat chisel and tap the wear ring and split the wear ring from the shaft.
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0013f.jpg

timberland
10-02-2010, 10:11 PM
Use 0000 steel wool and polish the drum shaft…if you nicked the shaft with your grinding effort, start with emery cloth and then finish with 0000 steel wool.

Trial fit the new wear ring…if it drops on, mix up some JB weld or waterproof epoxy and install the wear ring. If it doesn’t drop on, spray WD40 on the shaft. Place the wear ring into the kitchen oven and heat the wear ring at 400 deg for 20 minutes. Remove from oven and the wear ring will drop on the shaft…DO not force cool with water, let it cool naturally. I had help from mother nature…it snowed and was very cold outside so I chilled the shaft and the 400 degree sleeve dropped on. Don’t even think about placing the drum in your freezer…
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0014f.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0015f.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0016f.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0017f.jpg

timberland
10-02-2010, 10:12 PM
Now is a good time to clean the rear gable, most important is the weep hole in between the two and single seals. Obviously yours is plugged as the one in the photo, so we are spending this 3-4 hours together doing a bearing job because water collected in the bearings. Look closely once again where the seals are set, and the direction of the seal cups. Drive out the old seals and throw away. Clean hole with mineral spirits and a stiff brush… CLEAN. Remove the outer drum seal and clean the groove. NOTICE DIRECTION OF TAPER ON THIS OUTER SEAL. I used a wire brush on my grinder to clean the rear gable.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0012f.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0018f.jpg

Install the new seals with a small block of wood and a dead shot hammer. CAREFUL NOT TO BEND THE SEAL LIPS OR DISTORT THE OUTER STEEL RING. There is a tool for this called a seal installer, it’s the same outside diameter as the seal with a steel shaft that you tap on with a hammer. You may check your local Auto Zone to “rent” this tool, it does make the job easier…although not required. Install a light coating of WD40 on the outer lip of the new seal, it will assist in sliding into the gable. With the gable back facing you, insert the seal cup side facing you. Turn the gable over and do the same, inserting the seal so as the cup faces you, and once again insert another seal, cup facing you. If you notice the double seal cups towards the water side on the inner portion of the gable and the single rear seal cups toward the grease from the trunion. In between the gable double seal and single seal you should be able to see the weep hole. This hole, IF water was to escape the seal, would, should, drain out the weep hole before getting to the bearing. Install new outer seal, by gently tapping into groove.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-0019f.jpg

Install the gable onto the drum shaft. Lightly spray WD40 on the shaft and gently slide the gable onto the shaft and new wear ring. Install the new bearing into the gable. I like to take the old bearing and separate the inner from the outer race. Take the old inner race and grind the hole a little larger so the race slides easily on and off the shaft. Or use the spacer to drive on. DO NOT drive on the new bearing with a punch. Place the new “SEALED” bearing on the shaft and slide your newly made bearing driving tool or old spacer on and gently tap the bearing into the rear housing until it stops…you will know as you tap on the old driving race/ tool it will, ping, ping, ping, “thud”. It’s seated. Sealed bearings are prepacked with grease…this is the ONLY way to go. DON’T replace with open caged bearings that you have to pack.

timberland
10-02-2010, 10:13 PM
Install spacer, if you received a new one use it, if not no need to worry, use the old one. Install a new snap ring.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-021f.jpg

Install trunion and tighten bolts. Notice “UP” on trunion, align with “UP” on rear gable.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-023f.jpg

Install rear trunion “SEALED” bearing. Install bearing in the same manner as inner trunion sealed bearing by removing the inner from outer race from the old bearing, grinding out the center and tapping the new bearing in.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-024f.jpg

timberland
10-02-2010, 10:15 PM
Install the pulley and new pulley seal if you received one. Install the snap ring or nut to hold the pulley to the shaft.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-025f.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-026f.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-027f.jpg

Place a light coating of silicone sealant around the new tub seal, clean the scale off the stainless drum.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-028f.jpg

timberland
10-02-2010, 10:16 PM
Lift the entire mock up and set into the outer washer drum. Install the band clamps and tighten equally each side…gently tapping outside edge of band with a dead shot hammer as you tighten the clamps.

Attach the hoses and top water valve panel. Attach belt to motor, install rear panel. Tip washer back on it’s base.

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/Wascomat%20W74%20rebuild/Mvc-029f.jpg

Open the door and spin the drum….NO noise!!! Great job!!

Bee Smart has a great rebuild kit. Mr. Bob Bowley has passed on, those that never had the opportunity to speak with him really missed a great man…he helped me A LOT with my Milnor’s when I first bought our mat….I’m just paying forward my due for his kindness and generosity to me. His kits are still available…he even has a cheater kit that uses a sleeve over the wear ring if you elect not to remove the thick wear ring. If you use this cheater, you MUST use his seals also, as they are a tad larger on the inside diameter to compensate for the sleeve thickness. I personally like the idea of removing the old wear ring. Bee Smart also has a kit if the rear trunion bearing area is egg shaped. It’s made to hold a new race and bearing. It’s called a “housing saver”. 99.9% of us will never need this part…if you do, You seriously need to do maintenance a lot sooner than this time around.

:)

Whoo Hooo!!

Jefflange
10-02-2010, 10:22 PM
Nice instructions and great job.

timberland
10-02-2010, 10:22 PM
Do you all know how long it takes to post a total of over 11000 words and over 4 pictures per post....2 hours...I about quit 10 times ...hope you all enjoyed the post, WHEW!!!

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii317/rangerdvs205/CHAT%20ICONS/gonefishin.gif

Jefflange
10-02-2010, 10:27 PM
So your post took more time then doing the bearing job.

merlin3
10-02-2010, 11:40 PM
Great write up! It's threads like this that need to be put in a permanent easy to find home.

I think one more new category would be in order. Something along the lines of a DIY section that is a READ ONLY area. Articles like this could be moved there permanently, and we could slowly build a nice DIY database.

galaga
10-03-2010, 02:03 AM
Very nice post ,Bob Bowley helped me a lot when I was doing my first bearing job,I think his wife tried to sell the business and she is still selling some of kits.
I used Bee Smark kit ,aftermarket bearing kit,Wascomat factory kit,seal bearing ,pack grease bearing ,tried different grease ,I do not really know which way last longer ,most kits do not come with sealed bearing(black seal on both side of bearing) ,come with shielded (steel on both side of bearing),if kit comes with shielded bearing ,you will have to remove shield on one side(the side face in bearing) and pack grease.
Bee Smark kit always comes with sealed bearings.

timberland
10-03-2010, 07:44 AM
So your post took more time then doing the bearing job.

LOL...actually it did. I have had these pictures and a hand write up for close to 10 years. I am glad I finally placed them together for someone to use. I agree with who ever posted the thought of adding these how - to links as a sticky. I'm willing to start photoing and doing more write ups IF I can get the moderators to open up the forum for more than 4 picture post at a time....and more than 10000 characters in a post. I'll post the easy stuff and hard stuff... from a R&R an ignition ignitor box in a Dexter dryer to doing a main bearing job in a Milnor. What do you say Mods? can we ? can we? I have lots to share and say, LOL.

Adamski
10-03-2010, 08:35 AM
Timberland,

Well, after that nice bearing job description, I think you should post your name so we can give you true, proper credit. Great pictures too. That washer now looks like brand new!

As you know, doing a bearing job on the Wascomat is a piece of cake compared to doing a bearing job on a Milnor. I've done about two on Milnors. That's two more than I'd ever want to do. Did you use the hydraulic puller to push the Milnor basket/shaft assembly out of the bearing housing? We didn't have a hydraulic puller so my dad made up a huge screw puller that worked but not as easily or as quickly as the hydraulic one.

Anyway, thanks again for the bearing job post.

timberland
10-03-2010, 10:29 AM
No hydraulic puller pusher...I have two pullers, one has about a 1 1/2" bolt, 2'-0 long in a steel plate that you thread in the basket tighten the big bolt tight and then hit it with a 5# hammer...then tighten again, and hit it again. When I do this in our store I go around and warn every one there is going to be a VERY LOUD BANG. The other puller is very small and odd enough works too, smaller bolt and you about have to crawl into the drum to hit the end of it. I've done probably 6 bearing jobs on Milnors, takes about 3-4 hours to do the complete job, not a bad job, it's just not as easy as a Wasco. I've done 2 Wasco Jr's and one 184. ....ohhh, I can't post my real name because I'm in the witness protection program, LOL....j/k,...... Richard Jennings, Brite-N- Clean Laundry, Brooklyn, MI

Adamski
10-03-2010, 11:40 AM
Richard,

The large puller my dad made sounds very much like your large puller. I think his was about an 1 -1/4 inch size. As I recall (it's been a while), we would bolt the thick plate to the basket hub holes (after removing the set screws that preserved the holes) and then the screw would push against the main shaft end. This puller extended to the front of the basket so we could hit it with a 10# sledgehammer. Fun, fun, fun!

MrMachine
10-03-2010, 03:28 PM
Richard,

EXCELLENT JOB, and excellent posts/photos!
You are a natural for this business.

I especially like how you clean up the parts during the job with steel wool.

Howard
10-03-2010, 03:36 PM
Very impressive post! Thanks for all the pictures.

mjwalsh
10-05-2010, 12:02 AM
Timberland & others,

If anyone on the CLA Forum is interested --- I made a 2.27 MB pdf or a 2.19 zip file of your post & I will send it to you & all if you email me to info@kingkoin.com. It might be wise to safeguard this post in case it somehow gets lost on the CLA Forum. I see the CLA forum does require a zip or a jpg file to be less than 97.7 KB to attach. I agree these are tough limitations for certain more thorough posts. I suppose many of you can do like me & have a pdf print driver or other simple software --- to accomplish saving this great post more securely without me emailing it to you though.

Thanks again --- this is a masterpiece of a post! It is especially useful for people like us who plan on &/or are in the middle of improving the Gen4s making them better than a good percentage of the brand new washers at much less cost. That is using Larry's famous 25% of new --- general rule of thumb so to speak. It would be great if we could have your kind of guidance on as many older but "still worthwhile keeping" pieces of equipment as possible.

Mike Walsh King Koin of Bismarck, North Dakota

timberland
10-05-2010, 07:49 AM
*blush* I have this on MS word if anyone wants it...I could PDF it too. Thought never came to my mind, ya' all would find my post useful. It's not so much the forum here would do something to the post , however my photo's are hosted on photobucket...that is where it could be corrupted. email or pm me if any of you want this.... and thanks for all the kind comments.

chris2565
10-07-2010, 08:37 PM
do you ever have any problems getting the new bearings on? if so do you heat it, drive it on with a hammer.

Adamski
10-07-2010, 08:44 PM
do you ever have any problems getting the new bearings on? if so do you heat it, drive it on with a hammer.

Chris,

Yikes! Never heat new bearings to get them on. I have a press to press on new bearings. You can also use a flat punch and hammer to lightly tap the bearing in place. Never hit directly on the bearing. If you're using the punch method, be sure to re-position the punch from side to side with each tap so the bearing goes on nice and straight and does not bind. You must take care not to damage or warp the bearing during installation.

mjwalsh
10-07-2010, 11:06 PM
Chris & Larry,

Like Larry says a hydraulic press is the best. We have been tempted to get a portable one but they are really spendy. Larry, is that what you use ---- one of those better portable hydraulic tools?

From our experience, usually putting old bad identical bearings on top of the new one until the last one is above the shaft & then hitting squarely with the flat side of a 2 by 4 or 2 by 6 piece of wood works without damage. We find this preferable to the punch approach. The above bearing exerts pressure downward more evenly against the inner & outer sleeves or races of the bearing that houses the inner balls.

We have used a stationary hydraulic press for the W74s but for the W124s it was too small. We did have a machine shop make us a base that gets under the sleeve so we can remove the old shaft sleeve that is separate from the bearing without grinding it all the way. Making the sleeve hot real fast with an acetylene torch can help too.

MJ

Howard
10-08-2010, 11:06 AM
A metal pipe that just fits around the shaft is a good "tool" to use, when you strike it the pressure is evenly distributed on the inner sleave of the bearing to drive it in place.

MrMachine
10-08-2010, 12:16 PM
A metal pipe that just fits around the shaft is a good "tool" to use, when you strike it the pressure is evenly distributed on the inner sleave of the bearing to drive it in place.


Yes, That's what I've always done. The poor man's hydraulic press, haha.

timberland
09-26-2012, 11:25 PM
Hi guys....been a while since I posted here, Sorry. I take the old bearing off , then use a cut off wheel and remove the outer bearing cage....then take a die grinder and open up the inside diameter of the bearing race so it gently slips on the shaft. You then can use a brass punch on the face of the OLD bearing inner race and gently drive the new bearing on the shaft. In similar fashion, you can cut the inner bearing and cage out of a bearing and grind the Outside diameter of the bearing to make it smaller to again use as a driver.


Who ever ask me for the pdf of this how to, please send me a email and I'll email it to you. I have it MS Word too. richard@timberland-usa.com

Adamski
09-27-2012, 08:20 AM
... Who ever ask me for the pdf of this how to, please send me a email and I'll email it to you. I have it MS Word too. richard@timberland-usa.com

Richard,

Uh ... do you think this person is still waiting for those directions after 2 years?

mjwalsh
09-27-2012, 01:08 PM
Richard,

Uh ... do you think this person is still waiting for those directions after 2 years?

Larry,

Yup,:o

Especially since it was impossible to get any of my pdf makers to make from the forum separating the pages properly.

Hopefully, we can share down the road the best solutions to when the tubbacks become deteriorated.

mike:)

timberland
03-05-2013, 07:04 PM
Richard,

Uh ... do you think this person is still waiting for those directions after 2 years?

^^^ Yup...and I just had a request for another copy....free PDF's are available folks...you must email me though, I dont check in here daily.

edric
03-17-2013, 08:07 PM
Hello Everyone I'm Edric, :)

a little about me,my family owns a laundromat SINCE 95, ever since my father pass away, my mother and I have taken over it. We had our struggles and ups and downs but we know life moves on. The laundromat is going good and now we are trying to take it to the next level.

I own 1 mat in NYC and after reading countless of posts here I have decide to upgrade new equipments since their almost 18years old(W75,W125,W185) and HuebschOriginators (Twin30/45). Anyone Recommend any distributor that fix or upgrade their store that has reasonable price. What brand washer/dryer do you guys recommend? keep going with coins or use card? and how much does a card system cost?(maybe CCI)

you guys that fix/upgrade your stores, what other thing should I ask or be concern with.

I would like to thank you guys in advance..:applause::applause:

MrMachine
03-18-2013, 09:40 AM
Hello Everyone I'm Edric, :)

a little about me,my family owns a laundromat SINCE 95, ever since my father pass away, my mother and I have taken over it. We had our struggles and ups and downs but we know life moves on. The laundromat is going good and now we are trying to take it to the next level.

I own 1 mat in NYC and after reading countless of posts here I have decide to upgrade new equipments since their almost 18years old(W75,W125,W185) and HuebschOriginators (Twin30/45). Anyone Recommend any distributor that fix or upgrade their store that has reasonable price. What brand washer/dryer do you guys recommend? keep going with coins or use card? and how much does a card system cost?(maybe CCI)

you guys that fix/upgrade your stores, what other thing should I ask or be concern with.

I would like to thank you guys in advance..:applause::applause:

Call Jake from Commercial Laundry Solutions. He does a lot of that kind of thing. 718 439-1224

edric
03-18-2013, 06:03 PM
sorry I post at the wrong place no wonder I couldnt find it :D

Thank you Paul but do you know if they redo a old store? or only repairs.. i will do more research..

roger rabbit
03-21-2013, 12:09 AM
Thank you .This was a GREAT job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

timberland
06-10-2013, 11:34 PM
hey ya' all....I have a W74 that I noticed this evening is in need of a main bearing job. If any would like to practice with my instructions posted feel free to email me :p I'll loan the tools and my shop....this bearing job could get in the way of my fishing time :D.